April 16, 2014

Local author booktalk at Neill Public Library

To:  All media
Contact name/phone/e-mail:  Joanna Bailey / 509-338-3252 / jbailey@neill-lib.org
Event/Date:  National Library Week at Neill Public Library: Local Author Priscilla Wegars, April 16th, 5:30pm

Local author Priscilla Wegars will discuss her book As Rugged as the Terrain: CCC "Boys," Federal Convicts, and World War II Alien Internees Wrestle with a Mountain Wilderness at Neill Public Library, beginning at 5:30 pm in the Hecht Room on Wednesday, April 16th.

As Rugged as the Terrain explores some intriguing history that took place at Canyon Creek on the Lochsa River: first, in 1933, as a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp; next, in 1935, as Federal Prison Camp No. 11, a road-building facility for convicts mostly from the Leavenworth, Kansas, penitentiary; and finally, beginning in May 1943, as the Kooskia Internment Camp for Japanese detainees.

Priscilla is the Volunteer Curator of the Asian American Comparative Collection in the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Idaho.  She has conducted extensive research into the history of the Chinese and Japanese in the Northwest, and has directed several archaeological projects in the area.


Copies of As Rugged as the Terrain will be available on site through Book People of Moscow as well as Imprisoned in Paradise, Priscilla’s earlier book on the Kooskia Internment Camp.

April 15, 2014

Local author presentation at Neill Public Library

To:  All media
Contact name/phone/e-mail:  Joanna Bailey / 509-338-3252 / jbailey@neill-lib.org
Event/Date:  National Library Week at Neill Public Library: Local Author Janet Richards, April 15th, 5:30pm

Local author Janet Richards will discuss her book Crossing the River Sorrow at Neill Public Library, beginning at 5:30 pm in the Hecht Room on Tuesday, April 15th.

Many people are troubled by the inscrutable, inequitable nature of human adversity.  C.S.Lewis called it the problem of pain. In her memoir, Janet, a longtime nurse, takes a look this issue through the poignant, sometimes humorous stories of her career, as she traveled the River Sorrow with her patients and beyond, and lived her way to a place of peace.


Copies of Crossing the River Sorrow will be available on site through Book People of Moscow.

April 12, 2014

Keep a poem in your pocket...

Keep a poem in your pocket and a picture in your head, and you'll never feel lonely at night when you're in bed.  This first verse of a poem by Beatrice Schenk de Regniers puts voice to the national celebration taking place across the U.S. this month.  Yes, it's National Poetry Month and Neill Library has shelves of poetry books just waiting to be checked out and savored. Whether you read them to yourself or someone else, there's something quite moving about the work of poets and the impact they can have on our lives.  No matter the mood, the occasion or the need, there are poems for each and all.

Are you a nature lover? Then, be sure and check out the work of Mary Oliver or Robert Frost. Are you ready to have a good laugh or chuckle come into your day?  Then, look no further than the works of Billy Collins, Shel Silverstein or Spokane's own Kenn Nesbitt.  And for the celebration of ordinary objects in our lives, one must turn to the poems of Valerie Worth.  As a sampling, here is her poem about a safety pin:

Safety pin

Closed, it sleeps
On its side
Quietly,
The silver
Image
Of some
Small fish;

Opened, it snaps
Its tail out
Like a thin
Shrimp, and looks
At the sharp
Point with a 
Surprised eye.

Can one ever look at a safety pin the same way again?   Thus, the power and impact of poetry.  So, head to the library to get yourself a poem (or 2 or 200) to keep in your pocket today!
Kathleen,
Children's Librarian



April 10, 2014

Join us for author visits during National Library Week

We'd love to have you help us celebrate National Library Week (April 13-19) by joining us for local author presentations.

The first author visiting us on Tuesday, April 15 at 5:30 pm in the Hecht Room, is local author, Janet Richards. Many people are troubled by the inscrutable nature of human adversity. C.S. Lewis called it the problem of pain. In her memoir,  Crossing the River Sorrow: One Nurses Story, Janet, a longtime nurse, takes a look at this issue through the poignant, sometimes humorous stories of her career, as she traveled the River Sorrow with her patients and beyond, and lived her way to a place of peace.

Then on Wednesday, April 16 at 5:30 pm in the Hecht Room, we'll welcome Priscilla Wegars, local author and Volunteer Curator of the Asian American Comparative Collection in the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Idaho, who will discuss her book As Rugged as the Terrain: CCC "Boys," Federal Convicts, and World War II Alien Internees Wrestle with a Mountain Wilderness. Her book explores some intriguing history that took place at Canyon Creek on the Lochsa River: first, in 1933, as a Civilian Conservation Corps Camp; next, in 1935, as Federal Prison Camp No. 11, a road-building facility for convicts mostly from the Leavenworth, Kansas, penitentiary; and finally, beginning in May 1943, as the Kooskia Internment Camp for Japanese detainees.

Books from each author will be available for purchase at the respective presentations.

Note: the third presentation scheduled for April 17 has been cancelled.

April 07, 2014

Sew Pillows, Zippers, and More!

Join us tomorrow -- and every Tuesday!-- at 10 for Sew Happy, our program for machine- and hand-stitchers alike. 

Bring your own machine and get a little help getting to know it, or use one of the machines provided.

The suggested theme for April is "Pillows and Zippers... Pillows with Zippers!" or work on any project that is of interest to you!

Contact volunteer program organizer Linhda with questions, at 332-5340.

April 05, 2014

Libraries Celebrate in April

Today’s public library is more than a repository for books and other resources.   It is often considered the heart of the community.  It is a trusted place where everyone in the community can gather, regardless of age, gender, race, or income to engage with the world around them.

But a library doesn’t become a vibrant community space by staff alone.  It takes community support.  Lots of it.  Neill Public Library is fortunate to have that support from each of its 94 volunteers.  Last year these library lovin’ folks generously donated almost 1,900 hours of their time and talents to enhance library programs and services.  That’s a 90% increase over 2012.  We as staff celebrate our volunteers year round, but with National Volunteer Week (April 7 – 13) comes an opportunity to shine a spotlight on our volunteers and the important work they do.

Neill Library volunteers are always busy!  They assemble literacy packets for newborns at Pullman Regional Hospital, they welcome children to kindergarten with the gift of a new book and library card at Pullman School District’s kindergarten registration day, and they assist with special projects during the annual Summer Reading Program.  Each of these activities is funded by the Friends of Neill Public Library, a volunteer run nonprofit.

Volunteers also coordinate book delivery to homebound seniors at three local resident centers, conduct English as a Second Language conversation classes, keep our magazines and newspapers tidy, and serve on the library’s advisory and governing boards.

On behalf of the staff at Neill Library, I thank each and every one of you for your generous service.  Neill Library is a community treasure in very large part because of the investment from its community members.  You make a difference.

Neill Public Library will also take time this month to celebrate National Library Week, April 14 – 20.  This year, we celebrate the local author with three very different presentations.  Moscow author and long-time nurse Janet Richards takes a faith-based approach to pain and suffering in her book Crossing the River Sorrow:  One Nurse’s Story on April 15 at 5:30 pm.  Priscilla Wegars, Moscow author and curator of the Asian American Comparative Collection in the Laboratory of Anthropology at the University of Idaho will discuss her book As Rugged as the Terrain:  CCC “Boys,” Federal Convicts, and World War II Alien Internees Wrestle with a Mountain Wilderness on April 16 at 5:30 pm.  The week rounds out with a visit from Pullman author and WSU’s Executive Chef Jamie Callison for a savory discussion of his new book The Crimson Spoon.  Chef Callison’s presentation is on April 17 at 5:30 pm.  Books from each author will be available at the library for purchase.

Enter a drawing during National Library Week to win free literary prize baskets for children, teens, and adults, sponsored by the Friends of NPL.  Visit the library and enter often.  The winners will be contacted after April 20th.  It’s our way of saying “thanks” for supporting your library.

For more information, stop in at Neill Public Library, call us at 334-3595, or visit our website at www.neill-lib.org.

Joanna Bailey 
Director at Neill Public Library


April 03, 2014

Spring?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Palouse_hills_northeast_of_Walla_Walla.jpg



 Rain. Sun. Snow. Sleet.  It is springtime on the Palouse.  How do we know?  In a word - variety.  From hour to hour and day to day, there's no shortage of weather happenings where we live.  Yet despite the changes in weather, there is one thing that remains constant for those of us who call the Palouse "home".  That constant is the breathtaking sculptural beauty of the hills that surround us.  Like soft green inverted bowls, the hills enchant us and remind us of the reward of our ever-changing spring weather.  In other locales, April showers bring May flowers, but on the Palouse, they bring us emerald magic.

Neill Public Library is about variety as well. We are your go-to source for everything from DVDs to downloadable books, magazines, bestsellers and newspapers to programs for all ages and more! And if you don't find what you want let us know and we'll see if we can get it for you.  Even though we're all about variety, our constant pledge is to provide you with the best service possible.  That's one thing that you can count on, no matter the weather.  So, stop by and visit us soon. Happy Spring! 

Kathleen
Children's Librarian

April 01, 2014

No fooling! Check out the new items added in March

To find the new items added to the library collections in March, go HERE. You can request items directly from the catalog and we'll email you when they're ready to be picked up. New items are added to the downloadable collections every month as well. Check it out!

March 20, 2014

Pick your Flavor

We had another great Book Bites meeting yesterday, where we discussed all these great titles!  With such a range of different titles, there's something on this list for everyone. Click the links below to jump directly to the catalog to get the call number or place a hold.

Contact the library and watch here on the blog for information about other great upcoming programs.


700 Sundays and Still Foolin’ ‘Em: Where I’ve Been, Where I’m Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys? by Billy Crystal
The Big Year: A Tale of Man, Nature, and Fowl Obsession by Mark Obmascik
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Close to Famous, Hope Was Here, and Almost Home by Joan Bauer
The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier
Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell
Empty Mansions: The Mysterious Life of Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great American Fortune by Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell, Jr.
Everyone is Beautiful by Katherine Center
Faith Bass Darling’s Last Garage Sale by Lynda Rutledge
Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo and K.G. Campbell
Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai
King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography and Period 8 by Chris Crutcher
The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, A Walk in the Woods, and I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Notes on Returning to America After 20 Years Away by Bill Bryson
Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool
The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate and Patricia Castelao
The Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy by Jeanne Birdsall
A Pioneer’s Search for an Ideal Home: A Book of Personal Memoirs by Phoebe Goodell Judson
The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure by William Goldman
Saving Ceecee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman
Still Alice by Lisa Genova
Stuck in Neutral by Terry Trueman
Summer of the Gypsy Moths by Sara Pennypacker
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed

March 17, 2014

Don't Get Pinched!

If you forgot to wear your green today, grab one of these titles!  This list represents only a small portion of our fiction set in and nonfiction about Ireland-- head over to the online catalog or ask at the Information Desk for help finding even more great selections!



Tracing your Irish family history by Anthony Adolph.
The time of my life by Cecelia Ahern.
The secret army; the IRA, 1916-1970 by J. Bowyer Bell.
The pig goes to hog heaven by Joseph Caldwell.
The Isles: A history by Norman Davies.
The matchmaker of Kenmare: A novel of Ireland by Frank Delaney.
Casting off by Nicole R. Dickson.
Faithful Place by Tana French.
A portrait of the artist as a young man by James Joyce.
The great shame: And the triumph of the Irish in the English-speaking world by Thomas Keneally.
1916: A novel of the Irish rebellion by Morgan Llywelyn.
The complete idiot's guide to Irish history and culture by Sonja Massie.
In search of Ireland's heroes: The story of the Irish from the English invasion to the present day by Carmel McCaffrey.
Leprechauns and Irish folklore by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce.
Sometimes a rogue by Mary Jo Putney.
A Dublin student doctor by Patrick Taylor.

March 14, 2014

Book Bites-- Now on Wednesday!

Remember, your favorite lunch-time library program is now on Wednesdays! 

 

Our next Book Bites meeting is this coming Wednesday, March19th.  Drop by any time between noon and 1pm, as your schedule allows!

March 10, 2014

We're back!

We have completed our annual In-House Work Week and we are again open and ready to serve you! 

Our normal operating hours are:
Monday: 1-7
Tuesday: 10-7
Wednesday: 9-6
Thursday: 9-6
Friday: 1-5
Saturday: 1-5
Sunday: closed.

March 01, 2014

New Items at the library

To find the new items added to the library collections in February, go HERE. You can request items directly from the catalog and we'll email you when they're ready to be picked up. New items are added to the downloadable collections every month as well. Check it out!

Remember: the library is closed March 2-9 for our annual In-House Work Week.  Open hours resume on Monday, March 10 at 1 p.m.

February 26, 2014

In-House Work Week: Coming Soon!

Make time this week to stop by the library to stock up on books, DVDs, Audiobooks, and magazines.  The library will be closed to the public March 2nd through 9th for our annual In-House Work Week.



In-House Work Week is a time for the library to complete projects, conduct staff training, upgrade computer systems, and clean the building.   The fire truck and the farm house will get a new coat of paint, the floors and chairs will be shampooed, and we will generally make the building safer and cleaner. 

Although no materials are due this week, both book drops will be open for your convenience.

We look forward to presenting you with a trained, organized staff in a clean, fresh building when we reopen Monday, March 10th! 

February 24, 2014

Are we forgetting how to behave?



When was the last time someone said “please,” “thank you,” “you’re welcome,” and “excuse me” to you all in the same day?  Okay, let’s lower the bar.  When was the last time someone expressed three out of four of these courtesies to you in the same week?  Still no takers?  Unfortunately, I’m not surprised.

Something is happening to our manners and it ain’t pretty.  Call me old fashioned, but if a favor is being asked, I believe it should include a “please” or, at the very least, a “thank you.”  And attending to their request shouldn’t be a foregone conclusion.  If someone bumps into me hard enough to slosh the drink in my hand or walks in front of me so close it cuts me off, I would like to hear the offender say “excuse me.”  I don’t think I’m asking too much, especially when it requires so little from the other party.  Anymore, people who do remember their manners stick out like sore thumbs.  Since when did being polite and decent become the exception?  What a shame.     

Columnist for the Miami Herald and 2004 Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary Leonard Pitts writes often about the rudeness that exists in today’s culture.  Rudeness, he says, is a choice.  He feels the loss of common courtesy is reaching record levels across the nation and it’s time to rethink what we value so we can correct our course while there’s still time.  I couldn’t agree more. 

All too often I hear people state their requests and favors as demands.  Conveying gratitude seems reserved for extraordinary times, if it is even conveyed at all.  And, more than ever, there seems to be a strong sense of entitlement that is, frankly, appalling and misplaced.  Where does this attitude come from?  Can it be attributed, as some sociologists might suggest, to a specific generation’s overcompensating parenting style or is this fracture in etiquette the cost we pay for living in a fast-paced culture of instant gratification?  What do we gain when we lose our manners? 

Neill Library has 129 titles about etiquette, courtesy, and manners.  Publishing dates run from 1968 to 2014 and many different perspectives are offered.  Some titles like Gelett Burgess’ Goops and how to be them: A manual of manners for polite infants seem a bit extreme.  But others are more mainstream like Judith Martin’s Miss Manners’ basic training or Whoopi Goldberg’s Whoopi’s big book of manners.  The collection spans decades but each title shares a common point: being courteous to others conveys respect.  Being respectful and being respected both feel good.  And don’t we like feeling good?  Sounds like remembering your manners is a win-win for everyone.

I’m not na├»ve to the ups and downs of life.  It is not all sunshine and sparkles; bad days happen to good people.  The point is to become aware and make an effort.  And when you forget and behave like a boor, here are two other important words to try out:  “I’m sorry.” 

Please visit http://leonardpittsjr.com/ to learn more about Leonard Pitts.  Thank you for reading this article and I’m sorry if I have offended anyone.  If, on the other hand, I have inspired you to re-evaluate how you interact with others and make some positive changes in your own life, then you’re welcome.

Joanna Bailey

Library Director, Neill Public Library
2/22-2/23/14, Moscow Pullman Daily News